Snoqualmie Pass Real Estate, Mortgage, and the Economy – Empty Nesters’ Market


Snoqualmie Pass Real Estate, Snoqualmie Pass Properties, Snoqualmie Pass Homes, Snoqualmie Pass Lots, North Bend Real Estate, Snoqualmie Real Estate, Suncadia Real Estate, http://www.snoqualmiepassliving.com

Why It's Now An Empty Nesters' Housing Market

Mar 10, 2017
There’s a mismatch in the housing market. Demand is rising, yet homebuilders don’t have the capacity to create the supply the way they did in the boom years. They haven’t banked as much land, they haven’t filed the permits and they’ve become increasingly short of labor—one possible byproduct of the Trump administration’s crackdown on illegal immigrants. In fact, the nation is probably short about 700,000 homes on an annual basis. That explains why new home sales have been somewhat disappointing.
It also explains why sellers in many markets are now in prime position. According to Realtor.com, in December and January the supply of existing homes was 3.6 months, something that hadn’t happened since January 2005. In Seattle, for instance, the average time a house stays on the market is 36 days, compared with the national average of 90 days. In Dallas-Ft. Worth, it’s 42 days, according to Realtor.com. Combine that with the prospect of higher-priced mortgages thanks to the Federal Reserve’s decision to begin lifting interest rates and it makes buyers a little more motivated. “We’ve seen home sales surge because buyers are beginning to realize there is this expectation that mortgage rates will rebound: you might as well get in now,” says Bernard Baumohl, chief global economist at The Economic Outlook Group. He says prices are rising at twice the rate of inflation and more than two times the rate of average hourly pay. That’s bad news on the affordability front for first-time buyers who are trying to get onto the first rung of the housing ladder.
Click here for more articles from Time Inc.’s Looking Forward series.
But it’s great news for empty nesters and other homeowners looking to downsize. Even better, there’s less of a supply constraint because developers have targeted the boomer market by building high service, luxury condominiums in major markets. And why not, says Peter Wells, a partner at Real Capital Solutions, which is developing a luxury condo tower in suburban Dallas: “When [boomers] sell their big place, they're cash rich and it becomes all lifestyle driven.” Spring is a traditional time for buying and selling homes, and this season stands to be a busy one.
Snoqualmie Pass Real Estate, Snoqualmie Pass Properties, Snoqualmie Pass Homes, Snoqualmie Pass Lots, North Bend Real Estate, Snoqualmie Real Estate, Suncadia Real Estate, http://www.snoqualmiepassliving.com


Snoqualmie Pass Real Estate, Mortgage, and the Economy – Customizing a Space

Snoqualmie Pass Real Estate, Snoqualmie Pass Properties, Snoqualmie Pass Homes, Snoqualmie Pass Lots, North Bend Real Estate, Snoqualmie Real Estate, Suncadia Real Estate, http://www.snoqualmiepassliving.com


When Customizing a Space, Homeowners Are All About the Options

Whether it's a number of finishes, fixtures, or colors to choose from, homeowners want to collect as many ideas as possible before deciding how they want their new space designed


Remodels offer the perfect opportunity for homeowners not only to create a more functional space for their families, but also to beautify the home. Once they decide exactly what they need (more storage, an additional bedroom, a place for the dog to sleep), they turn to their remodeler to help craft the dream home and make the space uniquely theirs. What are homeowners looking for when they customize the home? It’s much more than just a pretty snapshot to share on Houzz.
Options Abound 
“It strikes me how, today, people want more and more things customized,” says Daniel Hurst, owner/general manager of Hurst Design Build Remodel in Middleburg Heights, Ohio. Hurst attributes this to the fact that he thinks his clients are more open to ideas now that they were in the past. The advent of the internet and idea websites like Houzz and Pinterest has made it easier for homeowners to expose themselves to new ideas.
“Never before in history could you look up ‘mudroom locker ideas’ and get 1,000 different ideas in three seconds,” he says.
Homeowners are looking to customize a home’s function in addition to its finishes, which is why they need the help of a highly skilled remodeler to walk them through the design process.
“People have kind of an idea, but they’re not sure what’s possible … sometimes it’s just a little bit of inspiration and we help them find the best options,” Hurst says.
Erik Block, founder/owner of Block Design|Build, Hadlyme, Conn., agrees. “Typically, everything we do is custom,” he says. “We start with ‘What are you looking for? What gets you excited?’ Then, we go from there and find the product that matches that.”
Block’s team has certain products and companies they recommend, but there are a few times where he lets the homeowners explore their options on their own.
“For bathrooms, a lot of the time, we have the homeowner do the homework. We’ll recommend certain fixtures we’ve had good luck with in the past and then they take it from there so that they can get exactly what they’re looking for.”
Those homeowners scrutinize their decisions. Block says that homeowners have analyzed the chrome finishes on flush handles and bathroom fixtures from different manufacturers to make sure that both are the same shade.
Homeowners can find as many options as they please, but the end result of the project still needs to mesh with their needs. Jason Walsh, lead industrial designer at Masonite’s Innovation Center, says that the one difference between a millennial and a baby boomer remodeling their homes is the functional requirements. Baby boomers, for example, often are remodeling their homes so they can age in place.
“The connecting feature [for all homeowners] is something with an updated design,” Walsh says. “They’re looking for something that fits their functional requirements, but is on-trend.”    
Cool, Warm, or Neutral?  One easy and fairly painless way homeowners can customize a home and keep it on-trend is through color. (Though, we’ll admit, the 1970s avocado trend was slightly painful.) Neutrals, such as grays, remain popular for both inside and outside of the home, but homeowners seem to be customizing their colors even further than a single shade.
“We have noticed that there’s a greater desire on the parts of builders and homeowners to have more specifically correct colors,” says Kate Smith, chief color maven at Sensational Color. “Rather than slapping on a gray roof, people want the specific gray that best matches their home.”
While companies are offering their products in a wide range of neutrals, many are also offering bolder hues. Tando’s all-new line of polypropylene exterior shake and stone is available in a variety of colors. TandoShake comes in three different collections: SignatureStain, Color, and Natural. SignatureStain comes in six colors. The Color Series offers 19 shades ranging from neutrals to bold colors like reds, yellows, and greens. The Natural Series features eight dark, earthy tones.
Instead of a fully colorful house, some homeowners are adding a touch of color to the exterior via the front door. John Gerhardt, associate product line manager for interior doors at Jeld-Wen, says that blues, greens, and yellows have been popular front door choices recently.
Walsh agrees that there’s more interest in color. He notes that turquoise and warmer colors like reds and yellows, inspired by the tropical regions, are popular choices for exterior doors. “Black continues to be popular,” Walsh says. “It’s a pretty bold statement.”
“We’re seeing more and more people interested in black,” Hurst agrees. “Black cabinetry, black trim, black doors, or some version of that in a charcoal color.”
The interior door is another story. Walsh observes that many homeowners want to stay neutral with their interior doors, only occasionally adding pops of color.
Smith warns that homeowners are willing to incorporate color, but they won’t step too far out of their comfort zones. Homeowners want to be educated about color and how to make color choices, she adds. They want to be told what they should know about color in order to make an informed decision.
Create a Clear Picture
Many of Block’s projects are remodeling and restoring historic homes, so a number of his jobs are focused on crafting a beautiful space that meshes with the architecture and design of the rest of the home.
“Everything has to match; everything has to be related somehow, whether it’s hues or colors or textures. We’ll push for certain looks,” Block says. “They’re not going to have a kitchen that’s all white and clean with nice marble countertops and then have the rest of the house be all black.”
Carrying a design throughout the home seems like a no-brainer
"It always seems to start with kitchens and baths and then homeowners take the rest of the home to that level. ...It's always kitchens and baths. Nobody ever says, 'I want to remodel my dining room.'" - Erik Block
for a remodeler, and product manufacturers are picking up on the trend. Jeld-Wen’s new Studio collection is a series of contemporary-style doors for both the interior and the exterior.
“We wanted to bring the whole home design together,” Gerhardt says. They settled on a contemporary style because not only have product manufacturers been shifting to a more modern aesthetic, but more homeowners are looking for the clean lines contemporary offers.
The craftsman style also has been popular, though it has been modernized with a “cleaner, simpler design,” Walsh says. For those clients who like the craftsman style and are looking to create a design throughout their entire home, Masonite has released an exterior door to coordinate with its craftsman line, Heritage.
“We don’t see people wanting to directly match the doors, but they want to coordinate,” Walsh says. “If they have a craftsman-style front door and they choose a craftsman interior, the panel layout on both doors might be different.”
Give a Little Bit
Customization doesn’t end at interior function and exterior style. It can also extend to the structure itself.
“We see people being more interested in the integrity of the build than the actual photoshoot at the end,” Block says. He says that for some remodels, homeowners are willing to spend money on the “behind the scenes” products, such as rain screens, that will protect the home, instead of spending that money on flashy, upgraded rooms or fixtures.
“I’m guessing it’s probably more common in [New England],” Block says. “It’s good to see that people care about that.”
Not every homeowner will need or want to spend money on structural components, but will instead want something customized in an unusual way. For those instances, Hurst advises remodelers to have an open mind.
“I think there’s a lot of opportunity for inspiration out there and you just have to be flexible with some of your ideas,” Hurst says. “People are looking for custom options for everything. … Any chance we get to provide those options, that’s what we want to do, and I think that’s what people are drawn to today.”

Snoqualmie Pass Real Estate, Snoqualmie Pass Properties, Snoqualmie Pass Homes, Snoqualmie Pass Lots, North Bend Real Estate, Snoqualmie Real Estate, Suncadia Real Estate, http://www.snoqualmiepassliving.com



Snoqualmie Pass Real Estate, Mortgage, and the Economy – Customizing a Space

Snoqualmie Pass Real Estate, Snoqualmie Pass Properties, Snoqualmie Pass Homes, Snoqualmie Pass Lots, North Bend Real Estate, Snoqualmie Real Estate, Suncadia Real Estate, http://www.snoqualmiepassliving.com


When Customizing a Space, Homeowners Are All About the Options

Whether it's a number of finishes, fixtures, or colors to choose from, homeowners want to collect as many ideas as possible before deciding how they want their new space designed


Remodels offer the perfect opportunity for homeowners not only to create a more functional space for their families, but also to beautify the home. Once they decide exactly what they need (more storage, an additional bedroom, a place for the dog to sleep), they turn to their remodeler to help craft the dream home and make the space uniquely theirs. What are homeowners looking for when they customize the home? It’s much more than just a pretty snapshot to share on Houzz.
Options Abound 
“It strikes me how, today, people want more and more things customized,” says Daniel Hurst, owner/general manager of Hurst Design Build Remodel in Middleburg Heights, Ohio. Hurst attributes this to the fact that he thinks his clients are more open to ideas now that they were in the past. The advent of the internet and idea websites like Houzz and Pinterest has made it easier for homeowners to expose themselves to new ideas.
“Never before in history could you look up ‘mudroom locker ideas’ and get 1,000 different ideas in three seconds,” he says.
Homeowners are looking to customize a home’s function in addition to its finishes, which is why they need the help of a highly skilled remodeler to walk them through the design process.
“People have kind of an idea, but they’re not sure what’s possible … sometimes it’s just a little bit of inspiration and we help them find the best options,” Hurst says.
Erik Block, founder/owner of Block Design|Build, Hadlyme, Conn., agrees. “Typically, everything we do is custom,” he says. “We start with ‘What are you looking for? What gets you excited?’ Then, we go from there and find the product that matches that.”
Block’s team has certain products and companies they recommend, but there are a few times where he lets the homeowners explore their options on their own.
“For bathrooms, a lot of the time, we have the homeowner do the homework. We’ll recommend certain fixtures we’ve had good luck with in the past and then they take it from there so that they can get exactly what they’re looking for.”
Those homeowners scrutinize their decisions. Block says that homeowners have analyzed the chrome finishes on flush handles and bathroom fixtures from different manufacturers to make sure that both are the same shade.
Homeowners can find as many options as they please, but the end result of the project still needs to mesh with their needs. Jason Walsh, lead industrial designer at Masonite’s Innovation Center, says that the one difference between a millennial and a baby boomer remodeling their homes is the functional requirements. Baby boomers, for example, often are remodeling their homes so they can age in place.
“The connecting feature [for all homeowners] is something with an updated design,” Walsh says. “They’re looking for something that fits their functional requirements, but is on-trend.”    
Cool, Warm, or Neutral?  One easy and fairly painless way homeowners can customize a home and keep it on-trend is through color. (Though, we’ll admit, the 1970s avocado trend was slightly painful.) Neutrals, such as grays, remain popular for both inside and outside of the home, but homeowners seem to be customizing their colors even further than a single shade.
“We have noticed that there’s a greater desire on the parts of builders and homeowners to have more specifically correct colors,” says Kate Smith, chief color maven at Sensational Color. “Rather than slapping on a gray roof, people want the specific gray that best matches their home.”
While companies are offering their products in a wide range of neutrals, many are also offering bolder hues. Tando’s all-new line of polypropylene exterior shake and stone is available in a variety of colors. TandoShake comes in three different collections: SignatureStain, Color, and Natural. SignatureStain comes in six colors. The Color Series offers 19 shades ranging from neutrals to bold colors like reds, yellows, and greens. The Natural Series features eight dark, earthy tones.
Instead of a fully colorful house, some homeowners are adding a touch of color to the exterior via the front door. John Gerhardt, associate product line manager for interior doors at Jeld-Wen, says that blues, greens, and yellows have been popular front door choices recently.
Walsh agrees that there’s more interest in color. He notes that turquoise and warmer colors like reds and yellows, inspired by the tropical regions, are popular choices for exterior doors. “Black continues to be popular,” Walsh says. “It’s a pretty bold statement.”
“We’re seeing more and more people interested in black,” Hurst agrees. “Black cabinetry, black trim, black doors, or some version of that in a charcoal color.”
The interior door is another story. Walsh observes that many homeowners want to stay neutral with their interior doors, only occasionally adding pops of color.
Smith warns that homeowners are willing to incorporate color, but they won’t step too far out of their comfort zones. Homeowners want to be educated about color and how to make color choices, she adds. They want to be told what they should know about color in order to make an informed decision.
Create a Clear Picture
Many of Block’s projects are remodeling and restoring historic homes, so a number of his jobs are focused on crafting a beautiful space that meshes with the architecture and design of the rest of the home.
“Everything has to match; everything has to be related somehow, whether it’s hues or colors or textures. We’ll push for certain looks,” Block says. “They’re not going to have a kitchen that’s all white and clean with nice marble countertops and then have the rest of the house be all black.”
Carrying a design throughout the home seems like a no-brainer
"It always seems to start with kitchens and baths and then homeowners take the rest of the home to that level. ...It's always kitchens and baths. Nobody ever says, 'I want to remodel my dining room.'" - Erik Block
for a remodeler, and product manufacturers are picking up on the trend. Jeld-Wen’s new Studio collection is a series of contemporary-style doors for both the interior and the exterior.
“We wanted to bring the whole home design together,” Gerhardt says. They settled on a contemporary style because not only have product manufacturers been shifting to a more modern aesthetic, but more homeowners are looking for the clean lines contemporary offers.
The craftsman style also has been popular, though it has been modernized with a “cleaner, simpler design,” Walsh says. For those clients who like the craftsman style and are looking to create a design throughout their entire home, Masonite has released an exterior door to coordinate with its craftsman line, Heritage.
“We don’t see people wanting to directly match the doors, but they want to coordinate,” Walsh says. “If they have a craftsman-style front door and they choose a craftsman interior, the panel layout on both doors might be different.”
Give a Little Bit
Customization doesn’t end at interior function and exterior style. It can also extend to the structure itself.
“We see people being more interested in the integrity of the build than the actual photoshoot at the end,” Block says. He says that for some remodels, homeowners are willing to spend money on the “behind the scenes” products, such as rain screens, that will protect the home, instead of spending that money on flashy, upgraded rooms or fixtures.
“I’m guessing it’s probably more common in [New England],” Block says. “It’s good to see that people care about that.”
Not every homeowner will need or want to spend money on structural components, but will instead want something customized in an unusual way. For those instances, Hurst advises remodelers to have an open mind.
“I think there’s a lot of opportunity for inspiration out there and you just have to be flexible with some of your ideas,” Hurst says. “People are looking for custom options for everything. … Any chance we get to provide those options, that’s what we want to do, and I think that’s what people are drawn to today.”

Snoqualmie Pass Real Estate, Snoqualmie Pass Properties, Snoqualmie Pass Homes, Snoqualmie Pass Lots, North Bend Real Estate, Snoqualmie Real Estate, Suncadia Real Estate, http://www.snoqualmiepassliving.com



Snoqualmie Pass Real Estate, Mortgage, and the Economy – Home Trends 2017

Snoqualmie Pass Real Estate, Snoqualmie Pass Properties, Snoqualmie Pass Homes, Snoqualmie Pass Lots, North Bend Real Estate, Snoqualmie Real Estate, Suncadia Real Estate, http://www.snoqualmiepassliving.com

15 Home Decor Trends That Will Be Huge in 2017

Home decor may not be as seasonally driven as ready-to-wear, but trends do come and go. Ubiquitous touches that were once considered stylish — think chevron and taxidermy — are now totally outdated. We want 2017 to be the year your living space really is a home sweet home, so we reached out to leading interior design experts and asked them to single out all the 2017 home decor trends that you need to know about. Read on for their picks.
“More and more resources are making real art more affordable than ever thanks to the handcrafted movement made popular thanks to sites like Etsy. People are looking for original artist-made works of art to hang on their walls,” says HGTV digital lifestyle expert Carley Knobloch.

Gem Tones and Warm Metals

“Gem tones will be big this year,” says Karen Asprea, director of Whitehall Interiors. “Pops of rich gem tones can brighten a space and make it feel luxurious and thoughtful. Warm metals are also big for 2017, so forget about stainless steel and brushed aluminum.”

Wellness Touches

“Wellness is a state of mind, but is promoted by the energy of our surroundings,” says holistic interior designer Clodagh. “Luxury and wellness go hand in hand, more so than ever in 2017. Feng shui and an emphasis on natural light will be at the core of design. You’ll be seeing more unique wellness amenities, like infrared saunas and state-of-the-art fitness centers.”

Greenery

“After Pantone announced ‘Greenery’ as 2017’s Color of the Year, we knew it would be a major trend in home decor this year. In addition to being a color that symbolizes a connection to the outdoors and the promise of spring, green also represents our desire to break out of our digital, hyper-connected lives and connect more with nature,” explains Knobloch.

Showers Are the New Tubs

“A clawfoot tub or a copper soaker used to be the focal point in a dream bathroom. The shower is now taking center stage with lots of amenities (think showerheads, sprayers and sticks), floor-to-ceiling windows that bring the outdoors in and high-tech touches for a custom experience,” says Knobloch.

Luxurious Finishes

“Opt for polished nickel instead of polished chrome. It’s warmer and feels more luxurious,” says Asprea, who also recommends opting for levers instead of traditional round doorknobs. “Using rose gold or brass is a plus.”
“2017 will continue to focus on ‘Instagram-worthy’ home decor elements,” according to HGTV Cousins Undercover stars Anthony Carrino and John Colaneri. Among their favorites is Nanoleaf Aurora, a modular LED panel lighting system that you can customize to display color-changing patterns or mimic candlelight. “It’s such a cool design piece and easy to use and you can control it through an app on your phone,” says Colaneri, who also singles out Buster + Punch Heavy Metal Matt Black pendants with Buster Bulb. “Great lighting is essential and can really make or break a room. Buster + Punch makes sleek, sexy lighting.”

Tech Doesn’t Have to Be Ugly

“Case in point: eero,” says Carrino. “Tech is no good if it can’t connect. Eero is the best home Wi-Fi I’ve ever used and it’s well-designed, so I don’t mind seeing it on a bookshelf or other well-placed location for connectivity. Tech doesn’t need to be ugly.”

Semi-Separate Kitchens

“Unlike the extremely open layout trend of recent years, I like the movement toward partially separate kitchens that aren’t the main focal point, but still allow those in the kitchen to mingle with guests when entertaining,” says Clodagh.

Texture

“Designers are striving to pull people off of their blue-lit screens through incorporating interesting textures into decor that are not only appealing to the eye, but also pleasant to the touch. Texture, sensuality and warmth play huge roles in my 2017 designs,” says Clodagh.
“We all went Kondo on our belongings and now the pendulum is swinging in the other direction. Tired of austere minimalism, we’re all about layering textures, adding more pillows and making our beds a little sloppier. We want our rooms to look like someone’s home,” says Knobloch.

Smart Accessories

“Storage space is often limited, so I always recommend purchasing chic everyday items that can be kept on display,” says Asprea, who also recommends upgrading kitchen appliances. “More companies are being creative with their finish selections and sizing options. Whirlpool offers matte black and matte white appliances now!”

Geometrics

“Triangular shelves, hexagonal tables, round mirrors…the pieces we love are coming in more geometric shapes than ever before. Play with curves and angles!” exclaims Knobloch.

It’s All Connected

“As more and more devices in our homes connect to the internet and to each other, we’ll be able to control and monitor our homes from just about anywhere,” says Knobloch. “Connected devices will allow us to monitor our energy consumption and improve everything from our sleep patterns to our proficiency in the kitchen.” On that note, Carrino suggests the Nest ThermostatProtect and Cam Indoor to start your smart home. “They all work together seamlessly and are a great foundation to start your smart home, not to mention aesthetically pleasing.”

Light as Art

“There’s a movement toward using light as art and there are really stunning lights being used to help cure SAD (Seasonal Affective Disorder) syndrome. Unique lighting can really tie a room together without adding an ounce of clutter. Combine up lights with down lights (up lights shining light upward, while down lights shine light downward) to balance the feng shui energy of your space,” suggests Clodagh.

Snoqualmie Pass Real Estate, Mortgage, and the Economy – Home Trends 2017

Snoqualmie Pass Real Estate, Snoqualmie Pass Properties, Snoqualmie Pass Homes, Snoqualmie Pass Lots, North Bend Real Estate, Snoqualmie Real Estate, Suncadia Real Estate, http://www.snoqualmiepassliving.com

15 Home Decor Trends That Will Be Huge in 2017

Home decor may not be as seasonally driven as ready-to-wear, but trends do come and go. Ubiquitous touches that were once considered stylish — think chevron and taxidermy — are now totally outdated. We want 2017 to be the year your living space really is a home sweet home, so we reached out to leading interior design experts and asked them to single out all the 2017 home decor trends that you need to know about. Read on for their picks.
“More and more resources are making real art more affordable than ever thanks to the handcrafted movement made popular thanks to sites like Etsy. People are looking for original artist-made works of art to hang on their walls,” says HGTV digital lifestyle expert Carley Knobloch.

Gem Tones and Warm Metals

“Gem tones will be big this year,” says Karen Asprea, director of Whitehall Interiors. “Pops of rich gem tones can brighten a space and make it feel luxurious and thoughtful. Warm metals are also big for 2017, so forget about stainless steel and brushed aluminum.”

Wellness Touches

“Wellness is a state of mind, but is promoted by the energy of our surroundings,” says holistic interior designer Clodagh. “Luxury and wellness go hand in hand, more so than ever in 2017. Feng shui and an emphasis on natural light will be at the core of design. You’ll be seeing more unique wellness amenities, like infrared saunas and state-of-the-art fitness centers.”

Greenery

“After Pantone announced ‘Greenery’ as 2017’s Color of the Year, we knew it would be a major trend in home decor this year. In addition to being a color that symbolizes a connection to the outdoors and the promise of spring, green also represents our desire to break out of our digital, hyper-connected lives and connect more with nature,” explains Knobloch.

Showers Are the New Tubs

“A clawfoot tub or a copper soaker used to be the focal point in a dream bathroom. The shower is now taking center stage with lots of amenities (think showerheads, sprayers and sticks), floor-to-ceiling windows that bring the outdoors in and high-tech touches for a custom experience,” says Knobloch.

Luxurious Finishes

“Opt for polished nickel instead of polished chrome. It’s warmer and feels more luxurious,” says Asprea, who also recommends opting for levers instead of traditional round doorknobs. “Using rose gold or brass is a plus.”
“2017 will continue to focus on ‘Instagram-worthy’ home decor elements,” according to HGTV Cousins Undercover stars Anthony Carrino and John Colaneri. Among their favorites is Nanoleaf Aurora, a modular LED panel lighting system that you can customize to display color-changing patterns or mimic candlelight. “It’s such a cool design piece and easy to use and you can control it through an app on your phone,” says Colaneri, who also singles out Buster + Punch Heavy Metal Matt Black pendants with Buster Bulb. “Great lighting is essential and can really make or break a room. Buster + Punch makes sleek, sexy lighting.”

Tech Doesn’t Have to Be Ugly

“Case in point: eero,” says Carrino. “Tech is no good if it can’t connect. Eero is the best home Wi-Fi I’ve ever used and it’s well-designed, so I don’t mind seeing it on a bookshelf or other well-placed location for connectivity. Tech doesn’t need to be ugly.”

Semi-Separate Kitchens

“Unlike the extremely open layout trend of recent years, I like the movement toward partially separate kitchens that aren’t the main focal point, but still allow those in the kitchen to mingle with guests when entertaining,” says Clodagh.

Texture

“Designers are striving to pull people off of their blue-lit screens through incorporating interesting textures into decor that are not only appealing to the eye, but also pleasant to the touch. Texture, sensuality and warmth play huge roles in my 2017 designs,” says Clodagh.
“We all went Kondo on our belongings and now the pendulum is swinging in the other direction. Tired of austere minimalism, we’re all about layering textures, adding more pillows and making our beds a little sloppier. We want our rooms to look like someone’s home,” says Knobloch.

Smart Accessories

“Storage space is often limited, so I always recommend purchasing chic everyday items that can be kept on display,” says Asprea, who also recommends upgrading kitchen appliances. “More companies are being creative with their finish selections and sizing options. Whirlpool offers matte black and matte white appliances now!”

Geometrics

“Triangular shelves, hexagonal tables, round mirrors…the pieces we love are coming in more geometric shapes than ever before. Play with curves and angles!” exclaims Knobloch.

It’s All Connected

“As more and more devices in our homes connect to the internet and to each other, we’ll be able to control and monitor our homes from just about anywhere,” says Knobloch. “Connected devices will allow us to monitor our energy consumption and improve everything from our sleep patterns to our proficiency in the kitchen.” On that note, Carrino suggests the Nest ThermostatProtect and Cam Indoor to start your smart home. “They all work together seamlessly and are a great foundation to start your smart home, not to mention aesthetically pleasing.”

Light as Art

“There’s a movement toward using light as art and there are really stunning lights being used to help cure SAD (Seasonal Affective Disorder) syndrome. Unique lighting can really tie a room together without adding an ounce of clutter. Combine up lights with down lights (up lights shining light upward, while down lights shine light downward) to balance the feng shui energy of your space,” suggests Clodagh.

Snoqualmie Pass Real Estate, Mortgage, and the Economy – City Living

Snoqualmie Pass Real Estate, Snoqualmie Pass Properties, Snoqualmie Pass Homes, Snoqualmie Pass Lots, North Bend Real Estate, Snoqualmie Real Estate, Suncadia Real Estate, http://www.snoqualmiepassliving.com


Home and childcare costs go up inside the city limits
Snoqualmie Pass Real Estate, Snoqualmie Pass Properties, Snoqualmie Pass Homes, Snoqualmie Pass Lots, North Bend Real Estate, Snoqualmie Real Estate, Suncadia Real Estate, http://www.snoqualmiepassliving.com

Snoqualmie Pass Real Estate, Mortgage, and the Economy – The Golden Window

Snoqualmie Pass Real Estate, Snoqualmie Pass Properties, Snoqualmie Pass Homes, Snoqualmie Pass Lots, North Bend Real Estate, Snoqualmie Real Estate, Suncadia Real Estate, http://www.snoqualmiepassliving.com

By AIMEE PICCHI MONEYWATCH March 8, 2017, 1:21 PM

Selling your home? Here's the golden window for listing


Real estate may boil down to location, location, location, but an important part of the equation also turns out to be timing, timing, timing. 
U.S. home sellers who list their homes during the first two weeks of May sell their properties for an average premium of $1,500 and find a buyer nine days faster on average than those who listed at other times of the year, according to recent research from Zillow. The real-estate site
also found regional variations in that golden window, although generally late spring is the best time for sellers to start marketing their homes. 
Sellers generally start thinking about getting their homes ready to put on the market about five months before they actually list their homes, but it’s not too late to prepare a home for a May listing, said Zillow chief economist Svenja Gudell. Homes that require slight maintenance or repair projects may be in the best shape to get ready for a May listing, although Gudell added that listing a home outside of the window doesn’t mean it won’t sell or receive a premium. 
“If you are listing within this two-week window, this is when you’ll see the biggest bang for your buck,” she said. “Keep in mind it’s not just listing your home, but then you need to figure out, ‘I need to find another house,’ so it’s a parallel process.”
Across the U.S. on average, the ideal time to list a home is from May 1-15. Homes that go on the market in that window receive a premium of 0.8 percent, or $1,500 on average, Zillow found. Within that time frame, the best day to list is Saturday, it added. 
That last finding was intriguing, Gudell said, because the conventional wisdom in pre-Internet years was to list homes on Thursdays in order to include the listing in newspaper ads and to grab house-hunters’ attention before the weekend. With the popularity of home-listing apps, potential buyers are more likely to wait until Saturday to plan their visits to open houses or schedule appointments with realtors. 
“The information is at your fingertips, so you can list your home and have an open house on a Saturday,” she said. Buyers “get the information right away, sometimes in an email notification. There’s no need to have it happen on a Thursday when it took longer to channel to consumers.”
This spring and summer will likely be a seller’s market because there are 3 percent fewer homes on the market this year than in 2016. Some home buyers who failed to find properties last year will be renewing their searches this spring, she added. That’s particularly true in the starter-home category, where inventory is especially tight. 
“You will see a lot of competition for your home,” she said. “We have a lot of millennial buyers who are interested in cheaper entry-level homes. We are seeing homes move relatively fast compared with prior years.”
Snoqualmie Pass Real Estate, Snoqualmie Pass Properties, Snoqualmie Pass Homes, Snoqualmie Pass Lots, North Bend Real Estate, Snoqualmie Real Estate, Suncadia Real Estate, http://www.snoqualmiepassliving.com


Snoqualmie Pass Real Estate, Mortgage, and the Economy – The Golden Window

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By AIMEE PICCHI MONEYWATCH March 8, 2017, 1:21 PM

Selling your home? Here's the golden window for listing


Real estate may boil down to location, location, location, but an important part of the equation also turns out to be timing, timing, timing. 
U.S. home sellers who list their homes during the first two weeks of May sell their properties for an average premium of $1,500 and find a buyer nine days faster on average than those who listed at other times of the year, according to recent research from Zillow. The real-estate site
also found regional variations in that golden window, although generally late spring is the best time for sellers to start marketing their homes. 
Sellers generally start thinking about getting their homes ready to put on the market about five months before they actually list their homes, but it’s not too late to prepare a home for a May listing, said Zillow chief economist Svenja Gudell. Homes that require slight maintenance or repair projects may be in the best shape to get ready for a May listing, although Gudell added that listing a home outside of the window doesn’t mean it won’t sell or receive a premium. 
“If you are listing within this two-week window, this is when you’ll see the biggest bang for your buck,” she said. “Keep in mind it’s not just listing your home, but then you need to figure out, ‘I need to find another house,’ so it’s a parallel process.”
Across the U.S. on average, the ideal time to list a home is from May 1-15. Homes that go on the market in that window receive a premium of 0.8 percent, or $1,500 on average, Zillow found. Within that time frame, the best day to list is Saturday, it added. 
That last finding was intriguing, Gudell said, because the conventional wisdom in pre-Internet years was to list homes on Thursdays in order to include the listing in newspaper ads and to grab house-hunters’ attention before the weekend. With the popularity of home-listing apps, potential buyers are more likely to wait until Saturday to plan their visits to open houses or schedule appointments with realtors. 
“The information is at your fingertips, so you can list your home and have an open house on a Saturday,” she said. Buyers “get the information right away, sometimes in an email notification. There’s no need to have it happen on a Thursday when it took longer to channel to consumers.”
This spring and summer will likely be a seller’s market because there are 3 percent fewer homes on the market this year than in 2016. Some home buyers who failed to find properties last year will be renewing their searches this spring, she added. That’s particularly true in the starter-home category, where inventory is especially tight. 
“You will see a lot of competition for your home,” she said. “We have a lot of millennial buyers who are interested in cheaper entry-level homes. We are seeing homes move relatively fast compared with prior years.”
Snoqualmie Pass Real Estate, Snoqualmie Pass Properties, Snoqualmie Pass Homes, Snoqualmie Pass Lots, North Bend Real Estate, Snoqualmie Real Estate, Suncadia Real Estate, http://www.snoqualmiepassliving.com


Snoqualmie Pass Real Estate, Mortgage, and the Economy – Endless Job Growth


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February 23, 2017

Endless job growth fuels robust multifamily market

  • Seattle’s fundamentals are strong, with vacancy rates hovering around 3.5 percent and rents climbing at 7.4 percent.
  • By DAVID YOUNG
    JLL
    mug
    Young

    Nonstop job creation and unprecedented single-family home prices are key factors driving Seattle’s thriving multifamily market.
    In September 2016, Seattle topped the nation in home price growth with an 11 percent increase over the year prior. Meanwhile, leading tech companies such as Amazon and Google have contributed to the creation of jobs at a rate of roughly 61,000 per year since 2010. This means an increase in the number of renters in Seattle, many of whom are tech employees who can afford higher rental rates in new construction apartment buildings.
    Seattle’s evolution from a secondary market to a top tech destination has created remarkably high demand and ensures a bright future for the city, with multifamily development expected to continue.
    Here are some highlights for Seattle:
    • Investor interest in core locations remains strong
    • Alaska Way Viaduct tunneling 85 percent complete, projected opening 2019
    • Seattle tops the nation in single-family home price growth for the first time in nine years with 11 percent year over year growth
    • Home values have increased nearly 60 percent since early 2012
    • $54 billion ST3 plan adds 62 new miles of light rail by 2036
    • Seattle condominium development starting; 1,012 units under construction with 75 percent in downtown core
    • International investment increasing; $752 million in Seattle/Bellevue since 2011
    • Fourth fastest growing city in the nation
    • Multifamily experiences record-breaking sales in 2016, with volume exceeding $5 billion for the first time
    • Interest in suburban locations has picked up dramatically as investors look for affordable rental assets
    Demand
    The rate of job creation is projected to continue as Seattle establishes itself as a primary market for out-of-state companies seeking lower office rents and proximity to Seattle’s growing pool of tech talent. Washington was recently voted the third most innovative economy in the country and leads the nation for technology/STEM growth.
    NerdWallet ranked Seattle as the second-best place for STEM graduates, and it has the highest salaries for software engineers of any city in the nation.
    The flight to affordability is also leading to increased interest in Seattle’s suburban markets while higher incomes, especially in the specialized fields of high-tech and bio-tech, allow landlords to raise rental rates when leases renew. However, even as rents in new construction buildings reach record highs in Seattle, they are still perceived as relatively inexpensive compared to other cities such as San Francisco.
    In San Francisco, the median tech salary is only slightly higher than Seattle’s: $110,554 versus $108,240. But figure in California’s income tax and the yearly cost of a one-bedroom high-rise apartment — $50,400 in San Francisco versus $33,600 in Seattle — and Seattle workers have nearly double the disposable income as Bay Area workers.
    Home values in Seattle increased by nearly 60 percent between early 2012 and 2016, and in 2016 a record-low 1,600 homes went on the market in King County (7,400 homes were listed for sale in 2015), so there’s no sign of relief for Seattle’s single-family housing market in the near future.
    Supply
    To answer the demand for rentals, 13,496 units under construction will hit the market this year. And, 10,387 new units hit the market in 2016, which is an impressive increase compared to the average 8,308 units delivered per year between 2012 and 2015 and 3,436 delivered per year between 2007 and 2011.
    Rent growth continues to surge with a 7.5 percent increase in 2016. In the north end, the 2016 increase was an even higher 9.3 percent, and the south end saw a 10.7 percent increase. In 2016, Seattle was the only city to be both one of the top 10 cities for rent growth and one of the top 10 cities for rental price.
    Market fundamentals
    Seattle’s multifamily fundamentals are strong with vacancy rates hovering around 3.5 percent — 0.8 percent lower than the national average — and rents climbing higher than the city has ever seen, at 7.4 percent compared to the national average of 3.8 percent.
    In 2016, Seattle experienced record-breaking apartment sales, with volume exceeding $5 billion for the first time. Also, there has been much more activity in the suburban markets with almost 40 percent of deals selling in Pierce and Snohomish counties.
    The strength of the Seattle market has extended beyond the downtown core, and now there is high demand for living in the suburban markets, as well as a significant increase in value for the properties trading in these submarkets.
    What’s to come?
    With core properties in the gateway markets such as Seattle so richly priced, investors are looking for the next neighborhood or suburb in the path of growth as a key to getting ahead of the market. The expansion of Sound Transit light rail will drive opportunities for development in these suburban markets.
    Aside from increasing the connectivity of the Puget Sound region, ST3 will drive new development and increase the price of real estate near the new stations. Not only will this add opportunity for suburban development for market-rate apartments, but it will act as a catalyst for further employment growth, office development and suburban migration.

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    Snoqualmie Pass Real Estate, Mortgage, and the Economy – Top 5 Sates

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    About Washington

    The United States completed its second transcontinental railroad in 1883, fulfilling its Manifest Destiny and shuttling more people to explore opportunities on the West Coast. Washington saw a population surge in the late 1800s as Americans arrived by the trainful, and as the territory became the “gateway to the gold fields” during the Klondike Gold Rush. Washington, the only state named after a U.S. president, gained its statehood in 1889.
    Today, the left-leaning state is home to more than 7 million people, and the population is expected to hit nearly 9 million by 2040.
    The Evergreen State is an outdoor enthusiast’s dream with its geological diversity, ranging from mountains to deserts, rainforests and a Pacific coastline. It offers the Olympic Mountains, the San Juan Islands and the nation’s highest peak in the Lower 48 at Mount Rainier.

    Snoqualmie Pass Real Estate, Snoqualmie Pass Properties, Snoqualmie Pass Homes, Snoqualmie Pass Lots, North Bend Real Estate, Snoqualmie Real Estate, Suncadia Real Estate, http://www.snoqualmiepassliving.com