Snoqualmie Pass Real Estate, Mortgage, and the Economy – 10 Remodeling Tips

Snoqualmie Pass Real Estate, Snoqualmie Pass Properties, Snoqualmie Pass Homes, Snoqualmie Pass Lots, North Bend Real Estate, Snoqualmie Real Estate, Carnation Real Estate, Suncadia Real Estate, Easton Real Estate, ThomasWolter.com, http://www.snoqualmiepassliving.com

If you're a fan of home rehab shows like DIY's "Rescue My Renovation" and HGTV's "Fixer Upper," you've probably imagined yourself in a work-worn tool belt and visor, pencil between teeth, home remodeling that dated kitchen or dingy bath that's been driving you crazy.
Question is, are you really up for a fixer-upper?
Despite what reality TV may lead you to believe, riding solo over a real-life reno is more like herding kittens on hover boards.
"The biggest misconception that someone might take away from watching a DIY show is that they can do everything themselves," says "Rescue My Renovation" host John "Johnny D" DeSilvia. "I strongly recommend that unless you are experienced in the trades, leave them to the pros."
Whether you plan to spiff up your current home or acquire a fixer at discount, renovations are all the rage today.
According to the latest report from Harvard's Joint Center for Housing Studies (or JCHS), U.S. home remodeling and repair expenditures will grow by 8 percent by the start of 2017, well exceeding the 4.9 percent annual average.
Even so, as if building a budget, drafting a design plan, sourcing materials, assembling a work crew and arranging financing weren't enough, there's also the endgame to consider: Will my home remodeling be worth it?
Here are some tips that will help.

Snoqualmie Pass Real Estate, Snoqualmie Pass Properties, Snoqualmie Pass Homes, Snoqualmie Pass Lots, North Bend Real Estate, Snoqualmie Real Estate, Carnation Real Estate, Suncadia Real Estate, Easton Real Estate, ThomasWolter.com, http://www.snoqualmiepassliving.com

Snoqualmie Pass Real Estate, Mortgage, and the Economy – 10 Remodeling Tips

Snoqualmie Pass Real Estate, Snoqualmie Pass Properties, Snoqualmie Pass Homes, Snoqualmie Pass Lots, North Bend Real Estate, Snoqualmie Real Estate, Carnation Real Estate, Suncadia Real Estate, Easton Real Estate, ThomasWolter.com, http://www.snoqualmiepassliving.com

If you're a fan of home rehab shows like DIY's "Rescue My Renovation" and HGTV's "Fixer Upper," you've probably imagined yourself in a work-worn tool belt and visor, pencil between teeth, home remodeling that dated kitchen or dingy bath that's been driving you crazy.
Question is, are you really up for a fixer-upper?
Despite what reality TV may lead you to believe, riding solo over a real-life reno is more like herding kittens on hover boards.
"The biggest misconception that someone might take away from watching a DIY show is that they can do everything themselves," says "Rescue My Renovation" host John "Johnny D" DeSilvia. "I strongly recommend that unless you are experienced in the trades, leave them to the pros."
Whether you plan to spiff up your current home or acquire a fixer at discount, renovations are all the rage today.
According to the latest report from Harvard's Joint Center for Housing Studies (or JCHS), U.S. home remodeling and repair expenditures will grow by 8 percent by the start of 2017, well exceeding the 4.9 percent annual average.
Even so, as if building a budget, drafting a design plan, sourcing materials, assembling a work crew and arranging financing weren't enough, there's also the endgame to consider: Will my home remodeling be worth it?
Here are some tips that will help.

Snoqualmie Pass Real Estate, Snoqualmie Pass Properties, Snoqualmie Pass Homes, Snoqualmie Pass Lots, North Bend Real Estate, Snoqualmie Real Estate, Carnation Real Estate, Suncadia Real Estate, Easton Real Estate, ThomasWolter.com, http://www.snoqualmiepassliving.com

Snoqualmie Pass Real Estate, Mortgage, and the Economy – 10 Anti Burglary Tips

  1. Snoqualmie Pass Real Estate, Snoqualmie Pass Properties, Snoqualmie Pass Homes, Snoqualmie Pass Lots, North Bend Real Estate, Snoqualmie Real Estate, Carnation Real Estate, Suncadia Real Estate, Easton Real Estate, ThomasWolter.com, http://www.snoqualmiepassliving.com
  2. Maintain your property. Especially in the wintertime, many people stay indoors and neglect issues such as peeling trim or an overgrown yard. But if the home looks unkempt, thieves may think it’s abandoned and, therefore, an easy target. Shoveling your walkways to clear them of snow and debris and removing holiday decorations and fallen tree branches in a timely manner will signal that the home is occupied.
  3. Know your neighbors. Many people don’t really know their neighbors; it’s more than just saying hi and being friendly. Invite them over to see your home before it goes on the market, and introduce them to the people they may see regularly stopping by during this time (especially your agent). Then they’ll know who is and isn’t supposed to be at your home and can better assess when there may be a threat while you’re gone.
  4. Assess your home’s vulnerability. Walk to the curb and face your house. Ask yourself, “How would I get in if I were locked out?” The first thing you think of, whether it’s the window with a broken lock or the door that won’t shut all the way, is exactly how a thief will get in. Think like a burglar, and then address the issues that come to mind.
  5. Respect the power of lighting. Criminals are cowards, and they don’t want to be seen. The house that is well-lit at night provides a deterrent because thieves don’t want the attention and the potential to be caught by witnesses. It’s wise to invest in tools that make nighttime light automation easy. That includes dusk-to-dawn adapters that go into existing light fixtures and motion detectors. But beware of leaving your exterior lights on at all times, which signifies the occupant is gone for an extended period of time.
  6. Use technology to make your home look occupied. In addition to lighting, smart-home technology has made it easier to make it appear like people are home, even when they’re not. Systems that remotely control lighting, music, and appliances such as a thermostat can help you achieve this. Though not considered smart-home tech, simple lamp timing devices available at hardware stores are also good for this purpose.
  7. Yes, it has to be said: Lock your doors. It’s amazing how many people think they live in a safe-enough neighborhood not to have to lock their doors when they leave. Some facts sellers should know: In 30 percent of burglaries, the criminals access the home through an unlocked door or window; 34 percent of burglars use the front door to get inside; and 22 percent use the back door, according to the FBI Uniform Crime Report.
  8. Reinforce your locks. A good door lock is nothing without a solid frame. Invest in a solid door jam and strike plate first, and then invest in good locks. Know the difference between a single-cylinder and a double-cylinder deadbolt. Double-cylinder deadbolts are recommended because they require a key to get in and out. For safety and emergency escape purposes, you must leave the key in when you are home. But double-cylinder locks are against regulations in some places, so check with your local police department’s crime prevention office.
  9. Blare the sirens. Burglars are usually in and out in less than five minutes, and they know police can’t respond to an alarm that quickly. Their bigger concern is witnesses to their crime. For that reason, an external siren is invaluable, whether as part of a monitored security system or a DIY alarm. Even if you don’t have an alarm, it’s not a bad idea to invest in fake security signs and post them near doors.
  10. Consider surveillance cameras. The Los Angeles Police Department started a program encouraging homeowners to install a device called Ring, a doorbell with video surveillance capability that allows homeowners to view what’s outside their door on their smartphone, in a neighborhood that was a target for burglaries. After Ring was installed in hundreds of homes, the burglary rate dropped by 55 percent, according to reports. Most state and local regulations require posting a warning that people are being recorded. (But again, this can be effective even if you don’t actually have the cameras installed!)
  11. Mark your valuables and record details. Use invisible-ink pens or engravers to mark identifying information (driver’s license or state ID numbers) on items. Log serial numbers and take photos of your belongings. Check to see if your police department participates in the Operation Identification program. They will have stickers for you to place on doors or windows warning would-be thieves that your items are marked. These steps may prevent them from pawning or selling stolen items and can help you reclaim recovered belongings.
Snoqualmie Pass Real Estate, Snoqualmie Pass Properties, Snoqualmie Pass Homes, Snoqualmie Pass Lots, North Bend Real Estate, Snoqualmie Real Estate, Carnation Real Estate, Suncadia Real Estate, Easton Real Estate, ThomasWolter.com, http://www.snoqualmiepassliving.com

Snoqualmie Pass Real Estate, Mortgage, and the Economy – 10 Anti Burglary Tips

  1. Snoqualmie Pass Real Estate, Snoqualmie Pass Properties, Snoqualmie Pass Homes, Snoqualmie Pass Lots, North Bend Real Estate, Snoqualmie Real Estate, Carnation Real Estate, Suncadia Real Estate, Easton Real Estate, ThomasWolter.com, http://www.snoqualmiepassliving.com
  2. Maintain your property. Especially in the wintertime, many people stay indoors and neglect issues such as peeling trim or an overgrown yard. But if the home looks unkempt, thieves may think it’s abandoned and, therefore, an easy target. Shoveling your walkways to clear them of snow and debris and removing holiday decorations and fallen tree branches in a timely manner will signal that the home is occupied.
  3. Know your neighbors. Many people don’t really know their neighbors; it’s more than just saying hi and being friendly. Invite them over to see your home before it goes on the market, and introduce them to the people they may see regularly stopping by during this time (especially your agent). Then they’ll know who is and isn’t supposed to be at your home and can better assess when there may be a threat while you’re gone.
  4. Assess your home’s vulnerability. Walk to the curb and face your house. Ask yourself, “How would I get in if I were locked out?” The first thing you think of, whether it’s the window with a broken lock or the door that won’t shut all the way, is exactly how a thief will get in. Think like a burglar, and then address the issues that come to mind.
  5. Respect the power of lighting. Criminals are cowards, and they don’t want to be seen. The house that is well-lit at night provides a deterrent because thieves don’t want the attention and the potential to be caught by witnesses. It’s wise to invest in tools that make nighttime light automation easy. That includes dusk-to-dawn adapters that go into existing light fixtures and motion detectors. But beware of leaving your exterior lights on at all times, which signifies the occupant is gone for an extended period of time.
  6. Use technology to make your home look occupied. In addition to lighting, smart-home technology has made it easier to make it appear like people are home, even when they’re not. Systems that remotely control lighting, music, and appliances such as a thermostat can help you achieve this. Though not considered smart-home tech, simple lamp timing devices available at hardware stores are also good for this purpose.
  7. Yes, it has to be said: Lock your doors. It’s amazing how many people think they live in a safe-enough neighborhood not to have to lock their doors when they leave. Some facts sellers should know: In 30 percent of burglaries, the criminals access the home through an unlocked door or window; 34 percent of burglars use the front door to get inside; and 22 percent use the back door, according to the FBI Uniform Crime Report.
  8. Reinforce your locks. A good door lock is nothing without a solid frame. Invest in a solid door jam and strike plate first, and then invest in good locks. Know the difference between a single-cylinder and a double-cylinder deadbolt. Double-cylinder deadbolts are recommended because they require a key to get in and out. For safety and emergency escape purposes, you must leave the key in when you are home. But double-cylinder locks are against regulations in some places, so check with your local police department’s crime prevention office.
  9. Blare the sirens. Burglars are usually in and out in less than five minutes, and they know police can’t respond to an alarm that quickly. Their bigger concern is witnesses to their crime. For that reason, an external siren is invaluable, whether as part of a monitored security system or a DIY alarm. Even if you don’t have an alarm, it’s not a bad idea to invest in fake security signs and post them near doors.
  10. Consider surveillance cameras. The Los Angeles Police Department started a program encouraging homeowners to install a device called Ring, a doorbell with video surveillance capability that allows homeowners to view what’s outside their door on their smartphone, in a neighborhood that was a target for burglaries. After Ring was installed in hundreds of homes, the burglary rate dropped by 55 percent, according to reports. Most state and local regulations require posting a warning that people are being recorded. (But again, this can be effective even if you don’t actually have the cameras installed!)
  11. Mark your valuables and record details. Use invisible-ink pens or engravers to mark identifying information (driver’s license or state ID numbers) on items. Log serial numbers and take photos of your belongings. Check to see if your police department participates in the Operation Identification program. They will have stickers for you to place on doors or windows warning would-be thieves that your items are marked. These steps may prevent them from pawning or selling stolen items and can help you reclaim recovered belongings.
Snoqualmie Pass Real Estate, Snoqualmie Pass Properties, Snoqualmie Pass Homes, Snoqualmie Pass Lots, North Bend Real Estate, Snoqualmie Real Estate, Carnation Real Estate, Suncadia Real Estate, Easton Real Estate, ThomasWolter.com, http://www.snoqualmiepassliving.com

Snoqualmie Pass Real Estate, Mortgage, and the Economy – West Coast Driving Real Estate Prices

Snoqualmie Pass Real Estate, Snoqualmie Pass Properties, Snoqualmie Pass Homes, Snoqualmie Pass Lots, North Bend Real Estate, Snoqualmie Real Estate, Carnation Real Estate, Suncadia Real Estate, Easton Real Estate, ThomasWolter.com, http://www.snoqualmiepassliving.com
National home prices climbed to all-time highs in October as real estate hot spots continue to send housing costs skyrocketing.
The latest S&P CoreLogic Case-Shiller U.S. National Home Price Index on Tuesday showed real estate values climb 5.6 percent from October 2015. That outpaces September's 5.4 percent annual increase and sent the metric to never-before-seen highs – surpassing even what was reached during the housing bubble of the mid-2000s.
This is now the second-consecutive month that the home prices have reached all-time highs. The national index was driven largely by gains out West – particularly in Seattle, Portland and Denver, where home values are up 10.7 percent, 10.3 percent and 8.3 percent on the year, respectively.
A separate price tracker published by Black Knight Financial Services also showed a 5.6-percent annual gain in October, similarly noting that the three cities "continue to outperform."
The Black Knight index also breaks down price gains at the state and metropolitan area level. California, Texas, Florida and New York saw the largest monthly state-wide price gains between September and October. Eight of the top 10 metro areas with the largest monthly gains were located in Florida. And the top 5 metros that saw the largest price declines over the month were all situated in Alabama.
Still, the Black Knight report indicates eight of the 20 largest states and 15 of the 40 largest metro areas in the country have seen post-recessionary home prices eclipse what was reached during the bubble years.
"Home prices and the economy are both enjoying robust numbers," David Blitzer, managing director and chairman of the index committee at S&P Dow Jones Indices, said in a statement Tuesday. "However, mortgage interest rates rose in November and are expected to rise further as home prices continue to outpace gains in wages and personal income."
Mortgage costs are also expected to rise as the Federal Reserve raises its benchmark interest rate in the months ahead. America's central bank managed to only get one hike out of 2016 – its second in a decade – but Fed officials earlier this month projected they'd be able to get as many as three increases out of 2017.
Each increase is expected to be marginal and will only impact mortgages slightly. But once they start accumulating, it's expected that mortgage rates will gradually tick higher. And that's not particularly good news for first-time homebuyers.
"Rapid growth in home prices may not be welcome news for those struggling to save to buy a home, and coupled with rising interest rates in coming years, some consumers may begin to feel the pinch of worsening affordability, especially in pricier coastal markets," Svenja Gudell, chief economist at real estate hub Zillow, said in a statement Tuesday.
Gudell notes, though, that "rapidly rising national home values themselves should not be confused with a widespread, rapidly inflating national housing bubble." That bubble was fueled in part by risky lending packages that are not believed to be nearly as prevalent today. She says that alarm bells shouldn't be sounded simply because home prices are eclipsing values reached during the bubble days.
"History is not repeating itself, and there is little risk of that happening as long as the national market continues to be driven by fundamentals," she said.
Snoqualmie Pass Real Estate, Snoqualmie Pass Properties, Snoqualmie Pass Homes, Snoqualmie Pass Lots, North Bend Real Estate, Snoqualmie Real Estate, Carnation Real Estate, Suncadia Real Estate, Easton Real Estate, ThomasWolter.com, http://www.snoqualmiepassliving.com

Snoqualmie Pass Real Estate, Mortgage, and the Economy – West Coast Driving Real Estate Prices

Snoqualmie Pass Real Estate, Snoqualmie Pass Properties, Snoqualmie Pass Homes, Snoqualmie Pass Lots, North Bend Real Estate, Snoqualmie Real Estate, Carnation Real Estate, Suncadia Real Estate, Easton Real Estate, ThomasWolter.com, http://www.snoqualmiepassliving.com
National home prices climbed to all-time highs in October as real estate hot spots continue to send housing costs skyrocketing.
The latest S&P CoreLogic Case-Shiller U.S. National Home Price Index on Tuesday showed real estate values climb 5.6 percent from October 2015. That outpaces September's 5.4 percent annual increase and sent the metric to never-before-seen highs – surpassing even what was reached during the housing bubble of the mid-2000s.
This is now the second-consecutive month that the home prices have reached all-time highs. The national index was driven largely by gains out West – particularly in Seattle, Portland and Denver, where home values are up 10.7 percent, 10.3 percent and 8.3 percent on the year, respectively.
A separate price tracker published by Black Knight Financial Services also showed a 5.6-percent annual gain in October, similarly noting that the three cities "continue to outperform."
The Black Knight index also breaks down price gains at the state and metropolitan area level. California, Texas, Florida and New York saw the largest monthly state-wide price gains between September and October. Eight of the top 10 metro areas with the largest monthly gains were located in Florida. And the top 5 metros that saw the largest price declines over the month were all situated in Alabama.
Still, the Black Knight report indicates eight of the 20 largest states and 15 of the 40 largest metro areas in the country have seen post-recessionary home prices eclipse what was reached during the bubble years.
"Home prices and the economy are both enjoying robust numbers," David Blitzer, managing director and chairman of the index committee at S&P Dow Jones Indices, said in a statement Tuesday. "However, mortgage interest rates rose in November and are expected to rise further as home prices continue to outpace gains in wages and personal income."
Mortgage costs are also expected to rise as the Federal Reserve raises its benchmark interest rate in the months ahead. America's central bank managed to only get one hike out of 2016 – its second in a decade – but Fed officials earlier this month projected they'd be able to get as many as three increases out of 2017.
Each increase is expected to be marginal and will only impact mortgages slightly. But once they start accumulating, it's expected that mortgage rates will gradually tick higher. And that's not particularly good news for first-time homebuyers.
"Rapid growth in home prices may not be welcome news for those struggling to save to buy a home, and coupled with rising interest rates in coming years, some consumers may begin to feel the pinch of worsening affordability, especially in pricier coastal markets," Svenja Gudell, chief economist at real estate hub Zillow, said in a statement Tuesday.
Gudell notes, though, that "rapidly rising national home values themselves should not be confused with a widespread, rapidly inflating national housing bubble." That bubble was fueled in part by risky lending packages that are not believed to be nearly as prevalent today. She says that alarm bells shouldn't be sounded simply because home prices are eclipsing values reached during the bubble days.
"History is not repeating itself, and there is little risk of that happening as long as the national market continues to be driven by fundamentals," she said.
Snoqualmie Pass Real Estate, Snoqualmie Pass Properties, Snoqualmie Pass Homes, Snoqualmie Pass Lots, North Bend Real Estate, Snoqualmie Real Estate, Carnation Real Estate, Suncadia Real Estate, Easton Real Estate, ThomasWolter.com, http://www.snoqualmiepassliving.com